Flipkart Sample Verbal Questions

Aptitude tests form a critical component the placement process at many corporate companies. Currently, Flipkart does not conduct aptitude test but many include it in future. Aptitude tests are standardized tests that designed to assess a candidate’s capabilities in performing a particular task and response to different situations. Quantitative aptitude checks problem solving ability of the candidates, their basic mathematical skills and comfort with data crunching. To score well, a candidate should focus on speedy calculations, sound fundamentals and strong analytical skills through practice.
You can practice the below given sample questions to practise for Flipkart’s aptitude questions:

DIRECTIONS for the question 1 & 2: Identify the meaning of the given idiom/ phrase.

Q.1 To pay one back in the same coin
  1. To provoke a person to quarrel
  2. To offer another polite attention
  3. To retaliate
  4. To give a word of encouragement or praise to another
Correct Answer:- C
Explanation:-
To pay back in the same coin means to retaliate.
Q.2 The popularity of great novel writer is on the wane.
  1. To gradually declining
  2. Becoming common
  3. Growing more
  4. At its peak
Correct Answer:- A
Explanation:-
The idiom ‘on the wane’ is used for something that is gradually declining in size, amount, intensity etc thus making it contrary to the once ascending popularity of novel writer.
wane means to decline

DIRECTIONS for the question 3, 4 & 5: The passage given contains blanks, choose the best choice in each case from the words in the options and mark your answer accordingly.

Q.3 ________ my travels I frequently stay in the houses of people I meet as often there are no hotels in small towns and villages that I visit.

A) During             B) Since                                C) From                                D) Through

Correct Answer:- A
Explanation:-
Since refers to either the starting point of time or to state a reason thus cannot be the suitable option 'Through' refers to a medium that is why cannot be a suitable fit From refers to a starting point and not making a right expression as 'from my travels'. Therefore during is the correct option making the right expression.
Q. 4 In my role as Chairperson of the Foundation I travel ________ in rural areas

A) extensively   B) somehow      C) extremely      D) hastily

Correct Answer:- A
Explanation:-
Travel is usually done in an extensive manner which means to a large extent or in a widespread way Options B is inappropriate as somehow means in some unspecified way
Option C seems unfit as to travel extremely is to travel in a severe manner which cannot be possible
Q. 5 In India a guest is always treated well; an old Sanskrit saying is Atithi Devo Bhava ________ that God comes in the form of a guest

A) threatens      B) meaning         C) fearing            D) imply

Correct Answer:- B
Explanation:-
Old Sanskrit saying Atithi Devo Bhava 'means' God comes in the form of a guest not implies as it strictly refers to something being made clear indirectly. Options A and C represent a negation, thus cannot be suitable.

DIRECTIONS for the question 6 & 7: Given below are five sentences. Identify the sentence(s) that is/are incorrect in terms of grammar and usage (including spelling, punctuation and logical consistency). Then, choose the most appropriate option.

Q.6
  1. I checked my disguise in the mirror; a ski hat and sunglasses did a good job of concealing my identity, even if I did look absurd.
  2. Normally I would have shared a laugh with my staff about this, but what we were doing that day was hardly any funny.
  3. A few blocks away, at a tobacco shop, I spent $ 80 to buy several packages of drugs that when snorted have a similar effect as ecstasy but are many more toxic.
  4. There was no back-alley drug dealer; there were no lowered voices or code words — just a small-business owner making a sale.
  5. I am telling you today, first as a father and then as a doctor, that the ease of that transaction chilled me. Kids everywhere are in danger from this substance, and the threat is legal, cheap and very deadly.

A) A and C           B) B, C and E       C) A, B and C      D) C, D and E

Correct Answer:- C
Explanation:-
In A, a colon instead of a semicolon as what follows is an explanation of the disguise. In B, any is redundant. In C, much and not many.
Q.7
  1. Environmentalists and lawmakers spent years shouting at one another about whether the grim forecasts were true, but in the past five years or so, the serious debate has quietly ended.
  2. Global warming, even most sceptics have concluded, is the real deal, and human activity has been causing them.
  3. If there was any consolation, it was that the glacial pace of nature would have been given us decades or even centuries to sort out the problem.
  4. But glaciers, it turns out, can move with surprising speed, and so can nature.
  5. What few people reckoned about was that global climate systems are booby-trapped with tipping points and feedback loops, thresholds past which the slow creep of environmental decay gives way to sudden and self-perpetuating collapse.

A) A and E           B) B only              C) B, C and E       D) A and D

Correct Answer:- C
Explanation:-

In B, them to be replaced by it as the word referred to by the pronoun is global warming. In C, would give instead of would have been given. In E, reckoned on and not reckoned about.

DIRECTIONS for the question 8: Choose an option, which can be substituted for a given word/sentence/phrase out of given options.

DIRECTIONS for the question 8: Choose an option, which can be substituted for a given word/sentence/phrase out of given options.

Q. 8 A single or repeated pattern:

A) Mosaic            B) Motif               C) Stencil             D) Design

Correct Answer:- B
Explanation:-
motif: a design that consists of recurring shapes or colours.

DIRECTIONS for the question 9 & 10 : Read the passage and answer the question based on it.

Passage I:

 I teach an undergraduate class on Nietzsche, a philosopher who has a reputation for captivating young minds. After one class, a student came to see me. There was something bothering her. “Is it OK to be changed by reading a philosopher?” she asked. “I mean, do you get inspired by Nietzsche—do you use him in your life?”You have to be careful about questions like this, and not only because the number of murderers claiming Nietzsche as their inspiration is higher than I would like. What the student usually means is: “Nietzsche mocks careful scholarship: Can I, in his spirit, write my paper however the hell I want and still get a good grade?” In this case, though, the student knew perfectly well how to write a scholarly paper. She wanted to do something else too: be Nietzschean!

Here’s my line, for what it’s worth: you can do whatever you want in life— take inspiration from The Smurfs for all I care—but I’m here to teach you how to read a philosopher, slowly and carefully, which is not an easy thing to do. If you want to be inspired by Nietzsche, you have to read him precisely, to make sure that it is Nietzsche who inspires you—not a preconception or a misappropriation or a scholarly reading, mine or anybody else’s, which is vulnerable to the interpreter’s peculiar agenda or the fashions of the hour. And what if, when you read him carefully, you find that he actually wrote things you think are false, wrong-headed, racist or sexist? It’s not a case of inspiration or careful scholarship, I say: choose both.

Notice: I am implying that if you get inspired by misreading someone, or by swallowing their false claims, then you’re doing something you shouldn’t be doing. Of course, you might get inspired to do great things by ideas that are wrong or questionable. (Nietzsche could have told you that.) Notice too: I work in an intellectual environment in which young people think that applying philosophy to their own lives is something unusual. It is an oft-repeated idea that philosophy in its modern, professional form has become detached from what was, in ancient times, a founding ideal: to teach people how to live well. In today’s university, the emphasis is on the search for the truth about whichever subject lies at hand, regardless of how, if at all, such truths change what you do when you leave the classroom. So while students often report finding philosophy “therapeutic,” they do so in passing, somewhat guiltily. Perhaps they worry that the moment I hear they’re an emotional Nietzsche-user rather than a cold Nietzsche-scrutinizer my opinion of them will fall. Perhaps, against my better judgment, and in spite of being a user myself, they are right.

Professional philosophers don’t present themselves as particularly wise or as people to turn to for advice about how to live.  And why should we? That’s not what we were trained for when we were students and it’s not what we promise in the prospectus. I remember, as a student, asking a philosophy professor something about what I should do the following year— whether I should continue with my studies or move on to something else. “That’s not a philosophy question,” she said. “That’s a life question! I can’t answer that.” I know what she meant, now more than ever, having faced such questions myself: you can’t expect a knowledge of philosophy to guide you through the big decisions about what to do with your life. But I can’t help wondering whether something has gone astray when “philosophy” questions and “life” questions are so easy to pull apart.

Q. 9 According to the information given in the passage, all of the following are correct except:
  1. In the modern day world, in contrast to ancient times, it is unusual to cohabit the views of philosophy in our own lives.
  2. Most students find philosophy therapeutic and report that it helps them understand things better.
  3. Professional philosophers are not trained to help people with their life questions.
  4. One needs to be careful of one’s inspiration and make sure that one is not getting inspired by the wrong ideas of the person one admires.
Correct Answer:- B
Explanation:-
Option 2 incorrectly modifies the lines: So while students often report finding philosophy “therapeutic,” they do so in passing, somewhat guiltily.
Option 1 is derived from the lines: Notice too: I work in an intellectual environment in which young people think that applying philosophy to their own lives is something unusual. It is an oft-repeated idea that philosophy in its modern, professional form has become detached from what was, in ancient times, a founding ideal: to teach people how to live well.
Option 3 is derived from the lines: Professional philosophers don’t present themselves as particularly wise or as people to turn to for advice about how to live. And why should we? That’s not what we were trained for when we were students and it’s not what we promise in the prospectus.
Option 4 can be derived from the lines: Notice: I am implying that if you get inspired by misreading someone, or by swallowing their false claims, then you’re doing something you shouldn’t be doing.

Passage 2

 Dr. Reid began by calling a local school district and asking if anyone had records tracking, say, reading comprehension. The district experts actually had 20 years of data. Better still, they had conducted studies that were quite informative—and tragic. Based only on the first year’s testing, researchers could predict how well students would do in the third year, the seventh, and so on.

“The model is highly predictive,” explained the voice on the other end of the phone. Reid was thunderstruck. With cold, scientific precision, the researcher explained to her that the current education system essentially set kids on a course of success or failure beginning in the first grade—independent of what anyone did afterward.

Stunned and indignant, Reid was determined to find out if there was something teachers could do to make a difference. Weren’t there teachers out there who started with children the model predicted would lag behind, but who helped the students beat the model? And, if so, what was the difference between those who were successful and everyone else? Reid pored over the data until she found teachers whose students did better in later years than before being taught by those teachers. For whatever reason, their students beat the model. Reid was also able to find teachers whose students did far worse than predicted after spending a year under their tutelage.

She gathered a dozen teachers whose students were achieving better results than the model predicted and asked them what methods they used to cause their students to read at a higher level than expected. They didn’t know what had led to success. Later she gathered teachers whose students had done worse than predicted and bluntly asked: ‘What are you doing that prevents the children from learning?” They confessed that they didn’t know.

For the next five years Reid watched both top and bottom performers in action in order to divine the vital behaviours that separated the best teachers from the rest. She codified, gathered, and studied data on virtually every type of teaching behaviour she and a team of doctoral students could identify. They had found certain behaviours that separate top performers from everyone else. They’ve proven to be the same behaviours across ages, gender, geography, topic, and anything else the researchers could imagine.

One of the vital behaviours consists of the use of praise versus the use of punishment. Top performers reward positive performance far more frequently than their counterparts. Bottom performers quickly become discouraged and mutter things such as, “Didn’t I just teach you that two minutes ago?” The best consistently reinforce even moderately good performance, and learning flourishes.

Q. 10 Extrapolating from what is stated in the passage, what additional role does a successful teacher play that helps students improve?
  1. Extrapolating from what is stated in the passage, what additional role does a successful teacher play that helps students improve?
  2. Explain things to a student, irrespective of the number of times the question gets asked
  3. Do not motivate a student to work hard on weaknesses so that they can become strengths
  4. Use an optimal mix of reward and punishment in order to develop a disciplined child
  5. Help guide a student to set her goals based on her individual strengths
Correct Answer:- D
Explanation:-
We are looking at practices of a successful teacher, which are already not mentioned. Extrapolating means extending from the current data. Goal setting is one of the important things that a lot of students omit to do. A teacher, playing the role of a mentor, can definitely add a lot of value to a student, if she helps her with this process.
1– Patience is already mentioned in the passage.
2– is a negative sentiment that cannot be derived from the passage
3– The passage does not talk about the role of punishment at all.
Rate Us
Views:1132